Construction Literary Magazine

Fall 2019

Fragments

Fragments
Cugusi 6
Cugusi

Cugusi 2

Cugusi 3

Cugusi 4

Cugusi 5

Cugusi 6

Cugusi 7

Cugusi 8

Cugusi 9

Cugusi 10

SIRO CUGUSI Artist Statement

“Out of monuments, names, words, proverbs, traditions, private records and evidences, fragments of stories, passages of books, and the like, we do save and recover somewhat from the deluge of time”       

 Francis Bacon

 

…heads, human bodies, flowers, landscapes, myth and mythology,……. a universe of signs, symbols, numbers, images, fragments, memories, words and unfinished sentences, hidden and deleted; Siro Cugusi ‘s works are characterized by figures that no longer correspond to the names we gave them, do not respect the traditional narrative, creating an autonomous language, a personal language and unknown, full of archaic and metaphorical meanings. Not as clear images, but in the way memories often present themselves to us; as in a dream, veiled, without logic , incomplete and colored by the moment.

“My work collects and systemizes the impressions of my everyday life…. My ideas are linked by the exploration of “what remains,” from fragments to collections  of detritus… photos, drawings…….memories accumulated , events and people, . This body of work represents a daily practice of searching, thinking and creating  visual ideas”.

Siro Cugusi ‘s process does not necessarily strive towards a preconceived result but can rather be seen as a sublimation of recalled images. In his paintings and drawings he often uses canvas, paper, wood and already existing materials, like, packing paper, pages of books, newspapers or encyclopedias. With his practice he mixes the original function of these materials with his personal imagery.

“….It is a search, a constant search…..I respond  very much to what is around me, I absorb things visually and collect them as thoughts, and if they resonate with me they will find their way out  and into my work.  Sometimes it takes years for something to enter the work, it lies dormant waiting to be activated……….I often draw or jot down these ideas and store them away. I sometimes stumble across them while rummaging through my notebooks in my studio and sometimes these ideas, thoughts, just come out on their own.”

Siro Cugusi in no way  fears measuring himself against materials and techniques. Quite the contrary, he freely allows himself to be influenced and in a certain sense seduced and swept away as he adopts means of expression that derive from other artists, from observations and opportunities, from meaningful functionalities, from the intermingling of genres and languages.

“My influences vary continually. They are so many levels in which my work is informed. Many of these levels of influence are separate from a recorded history, they are of a more personal history.”

The work of Siro Cugusi is the result of passion for painting and the will to convey through the layers of pigment on the surface, his need for knowledge. The matter is put in successive layers  to get a feeling of insecurity and imbalance between the bottom and shape.

“My work is a result of a layering process with materials and color. These layers are then scratched and scraped away to reveal the series of layers underneath.  It is a constant experiment and an enhancement of my artistic abilities. The combination of somewhat  materials such as oil paint, enamel, acrylic paint, spray paints, markers, colored pencils, oil wax pastels etc. allows me to have a more differentiated working process.”

We find in his painting an understanding of the deeper character of reality, the life of nature, decomposition and the alchemical transformation of elements: reflection on the human being and time. The works seem to be born in an imaginary place to go then in real space…. becomes thin the boundary between figurative and abstract images.

“The thing I am always most interested in investigating in painting is the field of tension between the figurative and the abstract………..When I start a painting I don’t have a specific picture in my mind’s eye. Each picture has to evolve out of a painterly or visual logic: it has to emerge as if inevitably……..If, while I’m painting, I distort or destroy a motif, it is not a planned or conscious act, but rather it has a different justification: I see the motif, the way I painted it, is somehow ugly or unbearable. Then I try to follow my feelings and make it attractive. And that means a process of painting, changing or destroying until I think it has improved. And I don’t demand an explanation from myself as to why this is so.